5 Ways to Fund your Life Abroad

Ahhh. The dream of moving overseas; living in some exotic land with tropical weather and interesting people. Freedom is what it really signifies. Getting your life back and really...
make-money-overseas

Ahhh. The dream of moving overseas; living in some exotic land with tropical weather and interesting people. Freedom is what it really signifies. Getting your life back and really living again. Exploring the world and seeing new things.

Unfortunately, for most of you, that’s all it will ever be.

A dream.

You see, the realities of moving, making an income, and picking up our roots is just too scary for most. But if you want a better, more interesting life, you are going to have to do something about it. Nothing changes unless you change it.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? Will you still be stuck in some boring office job driving down the same streets you’ve been driving down for the last 10 years?

Today is the first step towards your new life!

One of the main factors to consider when moving abroad is how to make an income. Unless you are retired or living on a pension, generating money is a fact of life and even in your new home land you will want an income.

 

Here are 5 ways to Make Money as an Expat

Freelance

What are you good at? With all of the online freelancing platforms and outsourced work these days, almost any skill can be monetized. Remote jobs and freelance gigs can be found in anything from graphic design work and web development to writing and data entry and even debt collection. If most of your work day is currently spent on a computer or telephone, there is a good chance you can figure out a way to do it from anywhere. You can find freelance work on websites like freelancer.com or Odesk.com, but the pay is generally low. Alternatively, you can search under gigs on craigslist for remote work opportunities in your field. Almost every industry has their own blogs and websites with online or remote job postings. Just do some research online and find out which have the most up-to-date job listings for you industry. Then get started applying.

Internet Based Business

This is for the tech savvy among us or for those willing to invest some money. An internet store or online service is a great way to make money while living in another country. Most of us will choose to live in countries cheaper than our home country and even a small online business can usually produce enough money to live on. Blogs and informational or how-to websites can also turn into a great source of income for the business minded and you don’t have to be too techy to get started. After the initial cost of building a website and SEOing it. You can manage the rest yourself with a good content management system. You just have to figure out what information you have that people want. Never forget there is no magic bullet, a good online store or blog will take work just like any business. The difference is that you’ll probably be working on your own schedule, in sandals on a beautiful beach, rather than in a dusty old office or cubicle.

Teach English

This is an oldie but goodie. Unqualified native English speakers have been moving to foreign lands and becoming teachers for years. Speaking English is a valuable skill and many people around the world are trying desperately to learn it. You can teach English anywhere from Spain to Japan to Thailand to Ecuador. Unfortunately, because of the afore mentioned unqualified teachers, English teaching pay is generally low, but enough to live in the country you are teaching. On the flipside, this means that you shouldn’t have too much trouble finding work to get started. If you put the time and effort in to become a qualified teacher, it is possible to find relatively good paying jobs that will even allow you to put some money in the bank towards retirement.

Become a Consultant

Ok. So I’m sure you’ve been doing something for the last 10 or 20 years and something tells me you’re probably good at it. Maybe it’s time to start your own consultancy firm. Can you help other businesses fix their problems or increase their bottom line? Figure out what marketable skills you have and look for a way to monetize them. If you’ve been a chef for the last 10 years, maybe you can offer menu planning consultancy or perhaps you were a marketing rep, maybe you can start a branding agency. Get creative and put a plan into action.

Become a Middle Man

Middle men always make money, and they best thing, they have very little overhead. Being a middle man can be anything from sourcing goods and exporting to helping people find real estate or buy a business. Keep your eyes open in your new home country and learn how business is done. If you can make it easier and safer for other foreigners to buy land, rent a house, or start a business then you have a valuable skill people are willing to pay for.

These are just a few ideas for ways to fund your life overseas. Every destination will have its own unique opportunities and you just have to be ready to take advantage of them. Life as an expat doesn’t mean you won’t have to work, you’ll just be setting your work up around your lifestyle instead of the other way around.

Are you living in another country and making a living? Leave us a comment and tell us how you fund your expat life.

 

Brett Dvoretz

A long time traveler and recent expat, Brett wandered through over 25 countries before he decided to settle in the little beach town of Sihanoukville, Cambodia. After struggling through the process of setting up a new life abroad, he decided to start Expats and Aliens to help other expats find the info they need before making the leap.

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One Comment
  • Ian Stevenson
    21 October 2016 at 8:56 am

    Hi Brett, 1st: my name is Ian Stevenson I am retired from the French Forein Legion and have been living in Thailand for the past 12 years, I really would like to make a change to Cambodia, I am single but my biggest problem is moving anywhere even here as I have a little dog, any advice on your part would be gratefully recieved, thanking you Ian

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